The Power of Sleep on Body weight

Weight loss and weight loss maintenance are one of the hottest topics we hear about in the media and that I see in my office. We are constantly inundated with information on how best to keep pounds off. But what if we’re sleeping through one of the biggest impactors of weight?

As many as 1 in 3 people do not get enough sleep. Sleep time and quality can impact how you lose, whether you lose, and how easily you gain weight. Lack of sleep (about 6 hours or less) can cause our hunger hormone ghrelin to increase and leptin, our hormone that suppresses hunger, to decrease, causing dysregulation of our entire system, increasing high-calorie food cravings, and reduced inhibitions. 

Designer Wellness knows the importance of sleep. That’s why we've created  Designer Wellness Sleep Support Gummies packed with melatonin, the neurotransmitter needed to help regulate your circadian rhythm and ease you into sleep. Pair our gummy with the sleep-enhancing foods below to help promote healthy sleep quality. 

Tart Cherries

According to research, tart cherries may help increase sleep time and promote sleep efficiency. These flavorful berries contain high amounts of melatonin to help regulate circadian rhythm and sleep. The polyphenols in tart cherries have been found to promote restful sleep even further. 

You can try adding tart cherry juice to your smoothies or chia seed pudding. You can also find tart cherries in our Designer Plant Meal Replacement.  

Fatty Fish

Fatty fish like salmon, sardines, tuna, mackerel, and anchovies are incredible sources of vitamin D and omega-3 fats. These two nutrients help regulate serotonin levels in the body, which helps regulate mood and our sleep-wake cycle. Research shows eating fatty fish three times a week helps improves overall sleep. 

Try including sustainably caught fatty fish in your meals by adding salmon to your bagel in the morning, enjoying a tuna fish salad, or simply grilling fish with a side of vegetables for dinner. 

Nuts

Nuts, including walnuts and almonds, are excellent sources of melatonin, magnesium, and zinc which research shows in combination can help people with insomnia sleep better. Magnesium and calcium help promote muscle relaxation, which helps relax us into sleep. Walnuts are a super source of sleep-enhancing magnesium, providing more than twice as much magnesium as almonds.

Both nuts are superstars when it comes to sleep. Add almond butter to your Designer Wellness smoothie, or top your chia seed pudding or oatmeal with walnuts.

Milk

Many of us may remember being given a warm glass of milk to help us sleep at some point in our lives. That comforting memory of milk before bed had a purpose. Milk contains an incredible amount of amino acid tryptophan, which helps produce serotonin. Serotonin helps with relaxation and is the precursor to melatonin. Both tryptophan and melatonin are well studied for their improvement in sleep and reduction of anxiety and depression. 

Try mixing milk with any of our Designer Wellness protein powders, or simply enjoy a glass of milk before bed to help promote sound rest. 

Bottomline

Sleep is the cornerstone of our health and can affect our weight, memory, and mood. If you are experiencing sleep disturbances, Try Designer Wellness Sleep Support Gummies before bed and a nighttime snack with walnuts, almonds, milk, or tart cherries to help you slip into dreamland. 

Sources: 


Chaput JP, Després JP, Bouchard C, Tremblay A. The association between sleep duration and weight gain in adults: a 6-year prospective study from the Quebec Family Study. Sleep. 2008 Apr;31(4):517-23. doi: 10.1093/sleep/31.4.517. PMID: 18457239; PMCID: PMC2279744.


The Sleep Foundation: The Best Foods To Help You Sleep Updated March 11, 2022


Friedman M. Analysis, Nutrition, and Health Benefits of Tryptophan. Int J Tryptophan Res. 2018 Sep 26;11:1178646918802282. doi: 10.1177/1178646918802282. PMID: 30275700; PMCID: PMC6158605.


Xie Z, Chen F, Li WA, Geng X, Li C, Meng X, Feng Y, Liu W, Yu F. A review of sleep disorders and melatonin. Neurol Res. 2017 Jun;39(6):559-565. doi: 10.1080/01616412.2017.1315864. Epub 2017 May 1. PMID: 28460563.